The Secret To Choosing The Best CRM For Your Sales Organization via Forbes

Executives who lead a sales organization often ask me which Customer Relationship Management (CRM) tool they should implement to achieve the best results. One of the first companies I founded years ago actually implemented CRM software for clients. From this experience, I quickly discovered organizations often over think what a CRM tool is intended to do. CRM tools are intended to help track interactions with current and future customers for the entire organization.

There are a ton of CRM systems in the marketplace. Each developer continues to add features and capabilities to extend their feature matrix. We don’t know if anyone actually cares about or uses those features, but the feature matrix is certainly growing for all vendors. After looking at all of the systems in the marketplace, the one you should use is…

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3 Ways to Get Health Care – Industry News Via Inc.

3 Ways to Get Big-Company Health Care Benefits for Your Startup

It’s that time of year again – the leaves are changing colors, the days are getting shorter, and your employees are thinking about which of your benefits offerings they want to take advantage of during Open Enrollment.
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It’s that time of year again–the leaves are changing colors, the days are getting shorter, and your employees are thinking about which of your benefits offerings they want to take advantage of during Open Enrollment.

Often during this time of year, companies are also thinking about which benefits really make sense for their business, and wondering how they can keep up with bigger competitors who have deeper pockets, particularly when it comes to keeping employees healthy.

Offering great health benefits makes sense for a couple of reasons. First, health benefits are highly valued by employees, so they help with attracting and retaining talent. And of course, keeping employees healthy can improve their productivity and reduce their time away from work.

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Restaurant-specific insurance exchange debuts in D.C. – Industry News via Washington Post

 Restaurant-specific insurance exchange debuts in D.C

Alisia Kleinmann, founder and chief executive of Industree Exchange. (Jeffrey MacMillan/For The Washington Post )

As a former Matchbox employee married to a Graffiato bartender, Alisia Kleinmann knows a thing or two about the lack of health insurance in the restaurant industry.

 

“My husband is 35 years old. We have two kids. He never had insurance,” said Kleinmann, president of the hospitality trade organization Industree.

“I just kept thinking, something has to change. Something has to get better.”Last week Kleinmann, 33, rolled out Industree Exchange, a private insurance exchange geared at Washington-area restaurants and bars with more than 100 employees.

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10 New Yorker Food Stories You Should Read Now That They Dropped Their Paywall

Eleven Madison Park chef Daniel Humm was profiled in 2012. You can read it today. For free.
Eleven Madison Park chef Daniel Humm was profiled in 2012. You can read it today. For free.

When news came down yesterday that The New Yorker was temporarily dropping its paywall (for all stories dating back to January 2007), we hit Google right away to find the incredible 2012 profile of secret supper clubs written by Dana Goodyear. The prospect of free, un-metered New Yorker reading? Talk about a rabbit hole. The publication, founded in 1925, has a long established reputation for commissioning lengthy, photo-light, well-sourced and well-funded reported pieces. So, along with its award-winning war correspondence, political hair-splitting and excellent arts criticism, we take particular notice when they write about the world of food — typically highlighted by an annual food issue, released in November. This morning we took a spin around the archives — available for free until the fall — for 10 of our favorite stories in recent memory, presented below with very brief summaries. We admit that we have not read them all. Yet.

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